VIDEO: O’Rourke Praises ‘Wisdom’ of Abolishing Electoral College

FreeBeacon:

Democratic presidential hopeful and failed Texas Senate candidate Robert Francis O’Rourke expressed support Tuesday for abolishing the Electoral College.

While departing a speaking engagement at Penn State, MSNBC reporter Garrett Haake asked O’Rourke, who goes by “Beto,” about his view on the question. “Last night, Elizabeth Warren suggested getting rid of the Electoral College. Is that an idea you would support?” he asked.

The article goes on to state the following:

“I think there’s— there’s a lot to that,” O’Rourke replied.

On Monday night, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) revealed her support for abolishing the Electoral College. “Every vote matters. And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” she said during a CNN town hall.

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